Columbus Day (EP.68)

In Podcast, Politics, Right or Wrong, Tolerance by Will Luden5 Comments

Summary

Q 1. Should we celebrate Columbus Day? A. Of course. The opening of the Americas to European countries was a monumental development. Q 2. Was Christopher Columbus intelligent, courageous, and dedicated to his beliefs and goals despite years of rejection?  A. Yes. All three, and at levels that allowed him to play a pivotal role in history. Q 3. Was Columbus a deeply flawed man, who savaged the indigenous populations? A. Yes, he was deeply flawed. As was every great man or woman in history. Every last one.

Experts in various fields correctly say that we need to deal with people and communities in a holistic way. I agree; let’s start with people like Columbus, FDR, JFK, Edison and many others in exactly that way. Let’s not be dishonest and portray only one side of the men and women who have shaped our country and the world. Presenting only one side–it does not matter which one one–to further an agenda is wrong and qualifies people as truth-twisters. A term we used in the last podcast, Profiling.

Links and References

Tolerance

Offense in in the Eye of the Offended

Contact

Please do reach out with comments or questions.  You can email me at will@resultswithreason.com, or connect with me on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

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Transcript

Q 1. Should we celebrate Columbus Day? A. Of course. The opening of the Americas to European countries was a monumental development. Q 2. Was Christopher Columbus intelligent, courageous, and dedicated to his beliefs and goals despite years of rejection?  A. Yes. All three, and at levels that allowed him to play a pivotal role in history. Q 3. Was Columbus a deeply flawed man, who savaged the indigenous populations? A. Yes, he was deeply flawed. As was every great man or woman in history. Every last one.

Experts in various fields correctly say that we need to deal with people and communities in a holistic way. I agree; let’s start with people like Columbus, FDR, JFK, Edison and many others in exactly that way. Let’s not be dishonest and portray only one side of the men and women who have shaped our country and the world. Presenting only one side–it does not matter which one one–to further an agenda is wrong and qualifies people as truth-twisters. A term we used in the last podcast, Profiling.

Let’s jump right into the deep end of this pool by bringing up Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King, born in Atlanta in 1929, is a genuine American hero. In 1964, he won the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolent resistance. And he helped to reshape how we think about and deal with race in our country, with worldwide reverberations. And he was a known plagiarist and a serial adulterer. That makes him human, and still very much a man well worth remembering and celebrating.

Thomas Edison, born in 1847, is known as the inventor of the light bulb. He also invented the phonograph and the motion picture along the way to being granted 1,093 patents. He founded one of America’s most successful companies, General Electric–GE. He was also a proponent of Direct Current, DC, as opposed to Alternating Current, AC. He fought vigorously, and often unfairly, to promote DC over AC. Had he won, the electric grid that in so many ways helped to build and supports the US would have been greatly delayed. And, yes, this flawed human deserves to be greatly honored for his many vital contributions.

Golda Meir, born in 1898, was the fourth prime minister of Israel. On her way to earning the unofficial title of “Iron Lady” well before Margaret Thatcher, the founding Israeli prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, called her “the best man in government.” She rallied her country after the horrific murders of Israeli athletes by appealing to the world to “save our citizens and condemn the unspeakable criminal acts committed.” She also had to resign after the crucial 1973 Yom Kippur War; her country was almost eliminated because the Israeli Defense Forces were mobilized late–despite many signs that an attack were imminent. And, yes, she is still a very legitimate hero to Israel, and those who believe in Israel’s right to exist.

George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are always in the mix when the question of who was our best President comes up. Washington was a slave owner, and Lincoln’s inability to come up with a winning General for the first painful years of the Civil War cost hundreds of thousands of lives and untold horrors and destruction.

Franklin Roosevelt was a powerful and influential US President. John F. Kennedy was a great US President whose time in office was cut tragically short. Both were longtime adulterers; Roosevelt with the same woman over the years, Kennedy with a medley. And all four deserve to be greatly honored.

Today’s key point. We are all flawed. And it is often the case that the more successful of us have the greater–or certainly the more publicized–flaws. We need to look at ourselves and others (as well as groups and countries) in a holistic light. Specific to today’s podcast, we need to see the men and women who have made huge contributions to our world as whole human beings; let’s recognize their enormous achievements along with their deep flaws. Picking and publicizing one side or the other of these men and women in pursuit of an agenda is, well, foul play, and merits the title of truth twister.

Let’s apply the two Results With Reason main tenets to today’s issues. The two main tenets that we believe in at Results With Reason are:

  1. Personal Responsibility; practice it, teach it and
  2. Be Your Brother’s Keeper.

Today’s application is again straightforward:

  1. Personal Responsibility. Engage in the political conversation. Don’t be afraid to stand up for what you believe, for what you know to be true. Show them love and trust as you do.
  2. Be your Brother’s Keeper. Be patient with each other; some will understand what you saying immediately, others will not. Teach and encourage; don’t criticize and reject. Love and lead. Remember, we are all in this together.

Now it is time for our usual parting thought. It is not enough to be informed. We need to act.  And if we, you and I, don’t do something, then the others who are doing something, will continue to run the show.

Remember: Knowledge by itself is the booby prize.

Will Luden, writing to you from my home office at 7,200’ in Colorado Springs.

 

Will Luden
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Will Luden

As an author, speaker, public company board chair, family man, a man with many friends (and friends-to-be), citizen and a child of God, I am driven to contribute. One way to for me to contribute is to start thought-provoking discussions.My overall objective is to stimulate “Passionate, Relentless, Reasoning.” My specific goals include getting people to act (only) after Reasoning.
Will Luden
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Comments

  1. Great honesty in your podcast. Love the point that we are all flawed individuals. Even the greatest among us. This is also where our faith steps in to enable to overcome those flaws and continue to live the best life we can in fulfilling the purposes God has for each of us.

  2. Well said. General Robert E. Lee also comes to mind. West Point graduate and outstanding general fighting for states rights. People associating him with promoting slavery as their only issue make a big mistake. Some in Texas want to remove the term “hero” from textbooks that refer to those who fought at the Alamo. Making a case against someone over a single issue is not healthy.

    1. Author

      Agreed. If Lee made a mistake, it was seeing that his loyalty was to Virginia, not the US. Had he accepted Lincoln’s offer to lead the North, the war would have lasted about 6 months.

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